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WSPA Animal Disaster Relief in Action: Brazil
Tweet Since January, WSPA's disaster relief team has been working in the Minas Gerais state of Brazil, helping animals affected by recent flooding and landslides. We are currently delivering emergency feed and basic veterinary care to the nearly 3,000 cats and dogs who are in need of our help in the region. Please view this slideshow of some of the animals we’ve already saved in Brazil. Then, to learn more about WSPA’s disaster relief work around the world visit our Animals in Disaster blog.

WSPA Disaster Relief - UPDATE
WSPA uses its expertise and knowledge to react quickly to disasters all over the world. The affect these disasters have on animals and their habitats can be devastating. This can also have a significant impact on the human population as more than one billion people worldwide rely on animals for food and for their livelihoods. Communication is difficult due to power cuts, but to date assistance has not been needed for animals in the region. An evacuation of up to 800 people will have to take place if any further activity is recorded, with working and companion animals therefore also affected.

Orissa disaster relief operation: update
WSPA’s Delhi-based emergency field team remain in Orissa State, working hard to provide emergency food, shelter, water and veterinary first aid to animals affected by the tornado which hit at the end of March. The relief aid supplied by WSPA is crucial in keeping the animals alive and protecting the livelihoods and nutrition of the community. To date, nearly 1,500 animals have received concentrated feed, building their strength, and around 300 have received emergency veterinary care for tornado-related injuries. WSPA has also provided materials for and helped villagers construct 500 animal shelters, with 100 more to come; each shelter will house four or five animals and protect them from the elements.

WSPA Deploys Emergency Teams to Asia Pacific Disasters
In the wake of devastating natural disasters in Indonesia, Samoa and the Philippines, WSPA has deployed emergency disaster assessment and response teams to ascertain the impact on animals. Initial assessments indicate that dogs and cats will have the greatest need for emergency relief. ‘The situation in the last few days has been terrible for Asian people and their animals, and the WSPA team has been putting in maximum effort to get to these areas to help animals who are suffering. These teams will ascertain the tsunami’s impact on the island’s animals and treat animal victims. Yesterday Indonesia was struck by two very strong earthquakes close to Pedang in Sumatra that killed hundreds of people and trapped thousands in the rubble.

WSPA brings aid to animals in disaster zones worldwide
Thanks to our supporters and member societies, WSPA has recently been able to come to the aid of thousands of animal victims of natural disasters around the world. Below is an update on our recent completed disaster relief efforts for animals. Post hurricane strike, the member societies undertook assessments for WSPA on the situation in country and on the animal need. In the aftermath, WSPA teams were on the ground providing animals with food and veterinary care and helping find shelter for lost and abandoned animals. Overall, WSPA funded and directed four disaster relief teams that worked with member society and government staff to reach and treat thousands of animals.

Disaster relief for pets helps people too in aftermath of Hurricane Dean
Weeks after Hurricane Dean, starving dogs are still guarding devastated homes, waiting for owners who may never return. When an ambulance with JSPCA and WSPA staff arrived at the house of a neighbor who had agreed to let the dogs stay temporarily, two frightened, small mixed breed dogs were darting along the side of the road dangerously close to speeding cars. One admitted that he had beaten them and driven them out into the street. Here the majority of people are thinking about how to survive rather than taking care of pets. TV and radio public service announcements are also part of the public education plan.

WSPA helps relief effort in West India
WSPA is supporting its member society the Animal Help Foundation (AHF) to bring emergency relief to livestock in the flood stricken provinces of West India. WSPA has stepped in to help AHF by providing financial support that will enable two teams of vets to treat around 20,000 animals over 20 days. WSPA working with its member societies in emergencies like this can relieve the suffering of thousands of animals, whose survival is also crucial to local communities ability to recover from such catastrophic events. Humanitarian organizations report that over 500 people have been killed nationally as a result of this year‘s flooding and more than two million people have been evacuated from low lying areas.

Delivering Aid to Animals: WSPA responds to five global disasters in 2010
With nearly 30 years of treating animals in post-disaster situations, WSPA has been involved in some of the world’s most devastating disaster relief efforts - including the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Even with four months still left in the year, our disaster management team has already provided relief to animals in five disaster-stricken areas across the world: Pakistan, Haiti, Mongolia, Chile and Guatemala. And, these efforts were only possible through the support and generosity of our supporters who donated to WSPA’s Disaster Relief Fund. Following the January 12 earthquake, a number of humanitarian organizations came to the aid of the Haitian people.

WSPA names Disaster Management Director
For more than 25 years WSPA has worked with the animal victims of disasters, and is often the first, and sometimes the only organization that will go to the heart of a disaster to save animals. This aspect of WSPA's work can be traced back to a landmark project in 1964 when WSPA staff directed the successful rescue and relocation of almost 10,000 animals in Suriname, South America, when 600 square miles of rain forest was purposely flooded during the construction of a hydroelectric dam. In addition to deploying disaster relief teams, WSPA has also implemented numerous long-term recovery projects to assist in affected areas.

Thousands of horses to benefit from new clinic
WSPA and member society Fundacion el Refugio Animal have opened a clinic to help the overloaded and overworked horses of Colombia’s capital Bogotá. The addition of the clinic is a huge advance for animal welfare in Bogotá – before it opened, horse workers had nowhere to take sick or injured animals. WSPA believes the best and most sustainable way to address the problem of poorly treated horses is to work closely with owners and teach them how to care for their animals. Projects undertaken around the world have repeatedly proved that when shown how, horse owners are keen to improve the welfare of their animals.

WSPA provides aid to animals affected by Colombia’s disaster
For the past several months, WSPA has been addressing the current animal welfare need in the hardest-hit regions of the country. By the end of 2010, WSPA had provided aid to thousands of animals affected by the flooding in four different locations throughout Colombia, including the areas near the capital city, Bogota. Local WSPA member societies are committed to finding responsible and lovely homes for those dogs, so they can live a nicer life with a family after recovery. The WSPA veterinary team will stay in the disaster zone for at least eight more days, continuing to provide relief to thousands of more animals in towns that were devastated by the flooding.

Emergency relief for animals in East India
Over 20,000 animals were left in need of emergency aid after flash floods devastated more than 70 villages in the Eastern Indian state of Orissa. WSPA Member Society the Visakha Society for the Prevention of Cruelty Animals (VSPCA) has provided veterinary care and fodder to animals through teams of vets, field officers and local government veterinary surgeons. VSPCA will continue to provide aid and relief to animals in the affected areas. Humanitarian organizations report that more than 41,000 people have been directly affected by the disaster and over 80 people have died. Although waters are now receding, accessibility to certain areas is still impeded by waterlogged roads.

WSPA monitors two disaster zones
WSPA's disaster management team is currently monitoring two critical situations and assessing the needs of the animals in the affected areas. The WSPA is liaising with member societies in South East Europe after melting snow and heavy rain swelled the River Danube to its highest level in more than a century causing severe floods. Last year WSPA helped facilitate disaster relief work in Romania after its worst floods in 40 years by providing vital funds to its member society Vier Pfoten - International who delivered animal aid in the worst hit areas. The WSPA's disaster management team is monitoring the activity of a volcano on the Indonesian Island of Java which is threatening to erupt.

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A stray dog that has survived flooding, Colombia